Friday, 28 June 2019

Romulan Bird of Prey - 1/650 Vintage Recreation Display: Build Log #6

Greetings model builders!

Continuing on with the Bird of Prey...


After the last entry, I was in the process of my 'victory celebration' getting the model close to completion when I dropped it 4 times over the winter holidays, end of 2018.  After much work, here is the BOP finally ready for her decals!


This is where the nacelle popped off!


And the broken seam with the wing.  Next build, I will be using metal pins to lock the wings in as an armature.


The ventral side, good to go!


This model has only markings for the 'bird', but omits any window decals. In my opinion, Round 2 should have made them, like they did for the 1/1000 version of the kit.



So I took the window decals from this smaller kit and made my own to scale in Photoshop.



I also made my own window decals, taking a 'rubbing' on trace paper of my 2nd BOP kit.

(The NCC markings are for another build, I just like to use up the sheet with future builds.)
Here are the finished decals, sprayed with Decal Bonder on transparent decal film.


Since the Roman BOP, much like all the Star Trek ships of this era have no physical markings on them, I have to make my own guides, this time using trim tape.




A comparison of the other kit and this model.  It's fortunate I have 2 model kits - I often have a backup just in case for parts or decals.


The unfinished model kit helped me align where to place the rubbing transfer.


All marked up, ready to decal!!


I cut each decal window in to smaller sections for ease of placement vs. one lone strip, which usually tears.



The smaller strip is to go on the bridge section.


The first of the marking decals which in this case are the orange wing patterns.


Unfortunately, trying to trim the excess edge, the decal tore and had to be removed.  Good thing I have that second kit!


As I continue to decal this model, I use a combination of both Micro Set and Micro Sol to soften the decals so they look painted on.


In moving forward with the rim windows, I did the same thing and cut them down to individual pieces.



And here are the results!




Once the decals were allowed to dry overnight, I then sprayed the top side with a Tamiya Clear Coat to seal them and protect them.


Now is the time to fill the hole for the stand and have a smooth bottom on the ventral side of the model.  At first, I though the plug,  as seen here, might do the job.


Way too small.  The plug is designed to be used if you're hanging this model.


The trusty base that served so well during construction.  It will get used on another model.


I ended up finding a piece of sprue to plug the hole.  The green tape is to isolate the area that needs to be filled and sanded.


Once cut smooth, red putty and a bit of sanding.


Priming...


More sanding...


And voila!  A blue patch that doesn't match the rest of the model??  Damn!


I ended up lightly coating the whole under side with this new paint, to blend in the repaired spot.  It the end it really doesn't matter as this will be covered by a large decal of the painted bird.


When I had the model marked up from before, I had placement marks on the bottom of the hull.


With such a large decal, I figured the easiest way was to cut up the decal in smaller pieces.


First section went on, ok.  But then I got to the other side of the decal...


And started to notice the decal breaking up!


To my horror, the 2nd decal from the other kit shredded once it hit the warm water.  You should have to coat factory made decals with decal bonder but this kit is about 9 years old or so.  Lesson learned.

I did try to see if I could order a new decal sheet from Round 2 but the kit is too old.  So back to the drawing boards!

That about wraps up this entry.  Below is a link to the previous entry, part 5.
Happy Model Building!

Star Trek and all related marks, logos and characters are solely owned by CBS Studios Inc. This fan blog (production) is not endorsed by, sponsored by, nor affiliated with CBS, Paramount Pictures, or any other Star Trek franchise, and is a non-commercial fan-made blog intended for recreational use.  No commercial exhibition or distribution is permitted. No alleged independent rights will be asserted against CBS or Paramount Pictures.

Tuesday, 26 February 2019

Klingon K'Tinga 1/537 Study Model Build Update 1

Greetings!

This is a new series of entries on the larger project I mentioned in the Retro Review of the K'Tinga kit, and is a pre-cursor for something else.  The whole purpose of starting this build is to have a paint subject for my 1:350 scale Klingon K'Tinga which I got for Christmas.  What a beautiful model kit!!  But this is the kit that came before and I'm building up a Round 2 re-pop that came out a few years ago.


UNBOXING


The parts didn't change at all with this kit from the original except for the stand and the socket for the rod in it.  I first opened this up 5 years ago in case anyone is keeping track with the previous entry.


This is what you get, 3 bags and a small decal sheet.


Part count like many kits of this era are low, 31 parts exactly plus the base and rod for the stand.


COMPARISON


I decided to compare this kit with TOS Klingon D7 (1:650 scale) model I have...



I built both of these models as a kid in the 80's and 90's and I remember their proportions were similar, but just how similar.  The K'Tinga is listed at 1/537 scale where as the D7 is 1/650.  Essentially the K'Tinga is a upgraded version of the D7 for the films much like the TOS Enterprise was refitted for the TOS movies, but the lines of the hull were much different.  Let's see how the K'Tinga and D7 compare...

1/650 D7 on the left, 1/537 K'Tinga on the right



I was pretty surprised how close the main body of the Klingon ship of both classes are basically the same.  Light blue is the TOS D7 and the green one is of course the K'Tinga.

The engineering section of the K'Tinga model appears greatly bigger but I always felt this was disproportional to the studio model.


The neck for both has the same girth but you can see the K'Tinga is elongated by about at least an inch!



The 'bulb' which I think is the most inaccurate section of this model is virtually the same size in profile as the D7.


From the bottom you can see how disproportionate the K'Tinga (top, old broken model I built in the late 80s).  The K'Tinga bulb isn't as wide as the D7 version.


The Bridge section is virtually identical (ellipsis and domed cylinder) meanwhile the D7 is actually larger here!


From the bottom, you can really see the size difference.


Using a bit of math here and photoshop, I've compared what 1:650 should look like to 1:537 and how it should size up.


It's pretty close.  You can see that scaled up, the D7 is larger than the 1:537 scale K'Tinga which is what I hypothesized.

1:350 K'Tinga comparison...


As I previously mentioned, the purpose of building this model is to test painting techniques for the larger 1:350 kit which was released in November 2018 by Round 2.


1:350 K'Tinga, 1:537 K'Tinga, 1:650 D7


What's really noticeable is how the neck droops on the old AMT kit.  This was a problem with many of the models of this era, very difficult to built them aligned properly without heavy modification.


Comparison of the engineering sections.



And the bridge section.


Scaling up the 1:537 to the 1:350 K'Tinga you can see the differences.  The 1:350 is supposed to be 1/2 scale model of the studio model, making it 1:187 scale at about 4 feet long.


The 1:650 scale D7, sized up is pretty much bang on to the 1:350 K'Tinga which is what I expected it to be.



CONCLUSIONS


I think the 1:537 K'Tinga and 1:650 D7 are the same size as the K'Tinga studio model was supposed to be, but the proportions are quite off.  The 1:537 K'Tinga has a special place in my heart as it was the only 'movie' version of the Klingon ship for decades and I grew up building it many times.

Despite it's flaws, it does build a nice, highly detailed model, one that was even used in DS9 as background ships supposedly.

That will wrap up this entry, until the next time!  To see the pre-update, check out this link:

https://fordosmodels.blogspot.com/2019/01/retro-review-klingon-battle-cruiser-pre.html

Happy Model Building!

Star Trek and all related marks, logos and characters are solely owned by CBS Studios Inc. This fan blog (production) is not endorsed by, sponsored by, nor affiliated with CBS, Paramount Pictures, or any other Star Trek franchise, and is a non-commercial fan-made blog intended for recreational use.  No commercial exhibition or distribution is permitted. No alleged independent rights will be asserted against CBS or Paramount Pictures.